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The Agile Brand

Creating authentic relationship between companies and consumers
By Greg Kihlström

About the Book

The Agile Brand is an Evolving Relationship Between Company and Consumer

Brands have evolved over several centuries from simple tools for recognition to something much more nuanced and sophisticated in the modern age. Being an agile brand means taking part in a relationship with consumers. While this means giving up some control over your brand, it rewards you with loyal long-term customers. The Agile Brand follows the story of branding from its beginnings to the authentic relationship with brands that modern consumers want, and gives practical examples of what you can do to modernize your brand in meaningful ways.


The Agile Brand offers marketing leaders a break from the past. It showcases how juggernauts such as Netflix and Starbucks are embracing continual change, and rewriting the rules between brands and customers. Kihlström demonstrates how the brand of the future must allow customers to feel a sense of brand ownership while staying true to their values that make it authentic. That’s the true essence of mindful marketing.
— Lisa Nirell, award-winning author of The Mindful Marketer, and founder of EnergizeGrowth® LLC

The Agile Brand is a follow up to 2016’s The Agile Web, which explored how the agile methodology, when applied properly to digital marketing and website design, can create dramatic improvements in their efforts. In his follow-up, Kihlström explores how brands that embrace consumer feedback and create a “living” brand that evolves over time while staying true to its values.


Greg Kihlstrom’s newest book ‘The Agile Brand’ reminds us of how fluid and temporal our impressions of products and services have become. How does a company stay relevant and recognized way beyond its logo? This book is a must have for any company looking to stay ahead of the competition.
— Susan Soroko, Arlington Economic Development

Kihlström poses the very human question: Is the brand a friend, teacher, or coach? Could it be a celebrity or a revered expert and authority figure? If you can answer that question, it changes how you think about activating the brand.
— Eric Gilbertsen, REQ